Why is the “Naked Gospel” by Andrew Farley wrong in it’s doctrinal foundation / Antinomianism

Posted: May 31, 2012 in General
Tags: , ,

I was asked by a friend to have a look at this book – i may see if i can grab it and review it, in the mean time, from what I have heard of it, im pretty concerned about its teaching, if some things found in the below link are accurate…

http://goye4th.blogspot.co.uk/2011/11/why-is-naked-gospel-by-andrew-farley.html

If you want to have a proper idea about this subject of forgiveness and confession of sin in the life of the believer, please listen to this sermon by John Macarthur:

http://www.gty.org/resources/sermons/62-8

I would also highly recommend this video – Dr Michael Brown deals with pretty much most of the arguments that are used by the hyper-grace teachers:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JEQj9sBEOEw

This will clear up the whole issue, and help you in your Christian walk with God! We DO need to confess our sins!

As i posted previously on this issue:

I’ve heard there is a teaching going around that says that once you are a believer, and are forgiven of your sin, you no longer have to confess your sins that you commit post conversion to God in prayer because He has already forgiven you, and if your conscience is bothering you, its not God…

What does scripture say?

“If we confess our sins, He is faithful and righteous to forgive us our sins and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness.” 1 John 1:9 [1 John 1:9 was written to BELIEVERS to tell them how to know if they are genuinely saved or not – confession of sin in life is a sign of a genuine believer!]

Confess here in the Greek is in the present tense, giving the sense of repeated or continuous action. Could be rendered “if we are confessing our sins”. Confession and repentance of sin is part of the Christian life.

What does Jesus himself teach about prayer ?

Luke 11:1-4

“1 It happened that while Jesus was praying in a certain place, after He had finished, one of His disciples said to Him, “Lord, teach us to pray just as John also taught his disciples.”
2And He said to them, “When you pray, say:
‘Father, hallowed be Your name.
Your kingdom come.

3‘Give us each day our daily bread.

***4‘And forgive us our sins,
For we ourselves also forgive everyone who is indebted to us.***
And lead us not into temptation.’””

I think if the Lord Himself taught us to pray in this way, that makes it pretty clear cut?

Lets just say for sake of argument that the folks want to take verse 4, and say it is not relevant for us today – then they have in effect thrown out the entire Lords prayer for the Christian today – if they want to deny one part of the prayer, they have to deny all the prayer, you cannot pick and choose what you believe. Just look at all the sections of the Lords prayer as we know and pray it today (most of us, by heart). Is it not true that we should pray for God’s will in our life and that He be glorified in this world? Is it not true that we should pray for God’s provision in our lives? To keep us from temptation?  Are these not all true for the believer today, and can be shown from other NT scripture? From where, then, comes the charge that the Lord’s prayer is redundant ?

Again I would urge you to listen to the sermon above i posted from gty.org!

Any questions, then please drop a comment in the comment box and ill get back to you ASAP 🙂

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Comments
  1. Rob says:

    Thanks for that post, it helped me to critically evaluate this contoversial yet important topic.

  2. Steffan says:

    Like with the controversial book Love Wins (and I’m definitely not getting into that here), I told people not to say anything about it if they had not read it. I mean, how would you like for people to assume (by hearsay and shorthand assumptions) the content and spirit of something you wrote when they have not read it? So, I would love to hear your perspective on The Naked Gospel if you have now since read it. But there is too much information and people just talking to talk and voice their suspicions and project their fears (through their hermeneutics of suspicion) onto things they think they are against when they really haven’t studied it. It’s the classic case of straw-manning.

    For instance, Andrew Farley explains his exegesis of both 1 John 1:9 and the Lord’s prayer quite articulately in the book. And, I would not expect anyone to agree with him or his view unless they took a look at the actual exegetical work leading to the view. And if someone can offer an exegesis which is sound and contradicts his rather than just looking at the verses simply (which isn’t really exegesis at all – not considering audience, time, culture, context etc.) then I say all the more power to them and I will listen to them. But I just wanted to offer that to you. Personally, I’m trying to evaluate Farley and his views for myself – which is why I was led to this article through a Google search. Would love to hear your further thoughts on this…

    -A fellow brother in Christ

  3. R. S. Adams says:

    Why would you reject & criticize a book that you’ve admittedly not read and know little of the actual content? Whether Farley is correct or wrong, in part or in whole, this specious rejection from ignorance serves neither Christians nor the the gospel.

    • “Why would you reject & criticize a book that you’ve admittedly not read and know little of the actual content?”

      Firstly, note that I said ‘if the following is accurate’. Do you have information to show that the post i’ve linked to is inaccurate, or are you merely pontificating?

      Based on the video that i posted in response to a previous comment (found here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R4cm0eL4Xys ) the comments by the guy doing the review seem more than justified.

      “this specious rejection from ignorance serves neither Christians nor the the gospel.”

      Much like your own comment then… I think I am more than justified in sharing resources that give a review of particular book from other resources that I have watched and read concerning his teaching – the youtube video for example – he denies key aspects of the Christian faith in that video.

      I suspect you also did not review the other links that I posted in this page before commenting – id suggest following your own advice before coming on to my page and post in hypocrisy.

  4. anonymous says:

    Thanks so much for your help! That MacArthur sermon was incredibly helpful. My small group is reading this book right now, and I’ve been struggling with a dull sense that something is off. Andrew is a great writer and is very clear. But I was struggling with dividing the Bible with the cross, and only accepting Scripture after the empty tomb for myself. The Sermon on the Mount isn’t for me? The 10 Commandments aren’t for me either? (I can’t remember if I’ve come across these ideas in the book or in youtube videos by Andrew.) These are the assertions that sent me looking for answers.
    MacArthur’s sermon brought so much clarity! Praise God for the way he has gifted his Church with clear thinkers like MacArthur. I can’t tell you how relieved I felt to hear that it is right and good for me to still confess my sin. Over the past weeks that we’ve been reading this book, I’ve started trying to ‘catch myself’, and instead say, “I confess that was sin, but it’s already covered in Jesus’ blood.” Yet, it was troubling to my soul. Tears streamed down my face when MacArthur clarified that yes, Christians still confess sin–they don’t need a full bath, but their feet are grimy. When we confess and repent and ask forgiveness, these are signs that we are true believers!
    I didn’t realize how much I treasure being able to go to Jesus with my sin and say, “Wash me!” What a relief that he is able and willing, not only to justify me once and all, but also to sanctify me–which is a slow and gradual process, once cleansing at a time.
    One thing that also helped me is to think about older, godly people that I know. Even though they sin so much less than they ever have, they are more aware of their sin than ever before, and so grateful for God’s grace. That’s what I want to grow toward. The other teaching is not helpful. The Naked Gospel has stripped away too much, in my opinion. It’s too bare. A muted man, whose only relevant words come after he has risen? God gave me so much more than this! The full counsel of his Word.
    Thanks so much for your help here, pointing me in the right direction. It meant a lot to me.

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